Health Benefits of Blueberries & Ginger


We all know it is important to eat fruits, vegetables, and all of that other good stuff, right? But do we actually know why? Obviously, because of all the health benefits they foster. But let’s get into the nitty gritty of it and see how exactly blueberries and ginger benefit our health. The pigment responsible for the color of blueberries is called anthocyanin. Anthocyanins have been shown in numerous health studies to have an anti-inflammatory benefit to the body.1 It also acts as an antioxidant which fights free radicals in the body and been shown to reduce risk of certain types of cancer.1 Blueberries are also a high fiber containing food, which is great for digestive health and cholesterol regulation.2 With all of those health benefits, and not to mention great taste, blueberries should be high up on your list of regularly consumed foods.

Ginger, in case you were wondering, is considered to be a spice, and it has actually been used for over 5000 years for medicinal purposes.3 Like blueberries, ginger has antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects on the body. Free radicals and inflammation are amongst the major causes of many chronic diseases we see today.3 Probably the most well documented benefit of ginger consumption is its anti-nausea effect. Numerous studies have been conducted and have come to the conclusion that ginger is generally effective for treating issues of nausea and vomiting.3 More health benefits of ginger include, but are not limited to, the promotion of weight loss, the reduction of menstrual pain and discomfort, and protection against Alzheimer’s disease.4 Safe to say, the combination of blueberries and ginger first of all can be delicious, as well as provide your body with some serious nourishment.


Written by: Mitch Hankerd


Citations:

1. Wong, C. (n.d.). The health benefits of anthocyanins. Retrieved March 31, 2021, from https://www.verywellhealth.com/the-scoop-on-anthocyanins-89522

2. Kelly Plowe, M. (2020, April 23). 17 high-fiber fruits to add to your diet. Retrieved March 31, 2021, from https://www.verywellfit.com/high-fiber-fruits-4178482

3. Neto CC, Vinson JA. Cranberry. In: Benzie IFF, Wachtel-Galor S, editors. Herbal Medicine: Biomolecular and Clinical Aspects. 2nd edition. Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press/Taylor & Francis; 2011. Chapter 6.

4. Leech, J. (2020, October 07). 11 scientifically proven health benefits of ginger. Retrieved March 31, 2021, from https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/11-proven-benefits-of-ginger#10.-May-improve-brain-function-and-protect-against-Alzheimers-disease